Greta Thunberg and March 15, 2019

In Sweden 2018, 15 year old Greta Thunberg sat outside the Swedish parliament with her water bottle, books, snacks and a homemade sign “SCHOOL STRIKE FOR CLIMATE.” Every Friday she left her school to do this. She says “No-one was interested, so I had to do it myself.” She was not alone for long. A flyer from her stated: “You grownups don’t give a shit about my future.” Sweden’s newspapers and reporters soon flocked around her. She still strikes every Friday. She spoke at the UN climate talks in Poland and called out world leaders for not being mature enough to tell it like it is. “Even that burden is left to us children” was part of her address to the global business elite at Davos. She even told the EU to double its climate change reduction targets as this would be its fair share of keeping the planet below the dangerous level of global warming. Greta affirmed her stance with a withering Ted Talk in Stockholm that left nothing behind and earned an ovation from a huge audience.

She lit a fuse among young people around the world. And that fuse has brought the EU to institute further steps to reduce Climate Change in Europe. Thousands of students in Europe and over 1,000 cities world-wide joined her “FridaysForFuture” campaign. Her example came amidst very dangerous warnings about climate change. Thunberg remarked that “Change is on the horizon, but to see that change we also have to change.” Thunberg has Asperger’s syndrome. She cites her neuronal structures as providing her single pointed dedication to the issue of Climate Change. She quips, “I see the world kind of black-and-white. Either we go on as a civilization or we don’t.”

This unusual warrior for Climate Change, now 16 years old, deserves the active attention of every adult in the world. She has put out a call for students world-wide to leave their schools on Friday March 15 to “Strike for Climate,” bringing out the determination of young people to force the hand of political change. Her model for this was the Parkland School students in Florida, who walked out of school to protest gun violence. Greta holds the firm desire for global student strikes to be non-violent, with no hate and no damage. She insists that everyone become educated about the Paris Accords, respecting science and personally minimising their carbon footprint. She requests children to do their homework about Climate Change, because most adults have yet to do so.

“Youth Climate Change US” are mobilized to point the Strike right at resistant politicians, demanding that they decarbonize the US economy, and furthermore make legislative action to combat the effects of climate change. The registered Climate strikes are planned in over 90 countries around the planet. Young people see that their present and future on the planet are at stake and they are pulling in university students and women to strike with them.

British PM Theresa May asserted that the school strikes are “wasting lesson time.” Greta’s sharp response was, “Political leaders have wasted 30 years of inaction. And that is slightly worse..” Good bye Theresa May and your ilk! It is apropriate to ignore her, when over 3,000 climate scientists have given their full backing to the strikes. I feel strongly that the response globally to the March 15 strike will be beyond anything we have seen on our planet. Please do your part – Support and Help.

Great Review for Poetry

Another Great Review – OnlineBookClub.org

ORDER BOOK: http://ianprattis.com/PaintingWithWords.html

Painting with Words by Ian Prattis is a collection of poems written at different times throughout the writer’s life. This collection is divided into six parts each one with a different theme. Every part is unique and deeply emotional with an extraordinary aesthetic that I’ve never come across in poetry before.

I really enjoyed the variety of themes, feelings, and lessons I received by reading this book. The first part “Bittersweet” is, in my opinion, the most melancholic. It’s the dark side of the poet who seeks consolation in writing poems to overcome his frustration and sadness. Soon after that, our writer takes us to wonderful landscapes to calm our troubled souls. “Painting with words” is the second part, and it’s literally a series of beautiful images illustrated with words. This part is a great reminder of how beautiful our world is if we just stop and behold it for a while. My personal favorite part is “Speaking of True Love”. As a romantic soul myself, I couldn’t help but adore each and every poem in this part. I could clearly see the depths of the poet’s love for his wife since every poem of this part is inspired by her. She is obviously his muse, and they have a beautiful love story that makes every poem even more sentimental and meaningful. The other parts are “Agua Viva”, “Footsteps of Buddha”, and “Ancient Wisdom”. I won’t give more details of these ones as I want readers to discover for themselves the rest of this collection.

What I can say though, is that after you finish reading this book you’ll probably find yourselves knowing the poet like he is your old friend. Every part is a different piece of Prattis’ puzzled life. He made sure to share every emotion and experience he had with us, and I think that is really brave and beautiful.

Reading this book was definitely an emotional roller coaster. The first part almost made me cry, especially the poem “ The Old Mare”. Some poems will make you think and others will put a smile on your face without realizing it. I’m sure everyone would find a poem to his liking in this collection. Furthermore, what I really appreciated while I was reading this book, was that the author, before every part, wrote an introduction. In those introductions, he explains why he wrote each poem, what inspired him, and what he was trying to achieve by writing it. This is extremely helpful because many times I find myself devaluing a poem since I can’t understand what it means. I also got to know the mentality of the poet better. I also loved the fact that the book starts with a poem dedicated to a Muse. This used to be a custom back in Ancient Greece when poets and writers asked inspiration from the Muse of writing. As a Greek, I’m very honored that a foreign poet decided to do that as well.

Overall, it’s clear to see that I loved every minute of reading Painting with Words. There was nothing not to like in this collection of poems. I actually read it twice, and I’m planning on reading it many more times. Moreover, I was pleased to see that it was exceptionally well edited. Thus, I’m happily giving this book 4 out of 4 stars. For those of you who love poetry, you should definitely give it a try. However, please keep in mind that some of those poems have curse words and some are hard to understand, so I wouldn’t recommend this book to an underage audience. Last but not least, many of these poems represent a Buddhist lifestyle and interpretation, so if you are offended by that, you probably wouldn’t enjoy this collection.

******
Painting with Words 
View: on Bookshelves

Smash Hit for Poetry Volume

Five Star Review

Reviewed By Kathryn Bennett for Readers’ Favorite

Painting with Words, Poetry for a New Era by Ian Prattis is a collection of poems that is split into six parts, each part having its own distinct theme. This collection of poems takes the reader through the full gamut of human emotions. The author has masterfully used his own life experience to transport the reader through this journey, while striving to leave a mark directly on the reader’s heart. Take the spiritual journey with the author and you may find yourself on your own journey as well.

I have to be fully honest in saying I read this book three times before settling in to write this review. Each time I felt like I uncovered another layer with the collection of poems that I had missed the last time through. To me, there is something truly magical about a work that can do that. The poems within this book are clearly very personal and strike right at the heart of the journey the author himself has taken in life, and yet it also has an ability to resound with others. The title painting with words is truly a perfect description of this poetry collection; you can see the images come to life before your eyes as you read. It was truly a pleasure to be able to read this collection of poems and it has inspired me to look back on some poetry I used to write and perhaps to start doing so again. I would highly recommend this book to any reader who loves a journey and wants to find themselves mesmerized by the written word. 

ORDER BOOK: http://ianprattis.com/PaintingWithWords.html

5 Star Roll for “Painting With Words”

Another 5 Star Review of Painting with Words, Poetry for a New Era by Ian Prattis

 BOOK REVIEW

Five Stars 

 Reviewed By K.C. Finn for Readers’ Favorite

Painting With Words, Poetry for a New Era is a book of inspirational verses written and compiled by poet Ian Prattis. Shying away from the old fashioned traditions of symbolism and imagery, the work expresses an emotional outcry in a raw and direct form, creating powerful auditory moments to express the highs and lows of the human condition, as our author sees and experiences them. The work is separated into six themed sections, travelling through different moments in recent history as the author experiences them, reflects upon them, and reaches different emotional conclusions along his journey to full discovery. What results is a work which runs the full spectrum of emotional consideration, taking a singular, personal experience and reaching for the qualities which make it universal to all.

One of the things which I found unexpectedly delightful about this work was the strong and recurrent connection to nature that Ian Prattis strives for. Whilst many of the works pertain to some of humanity’s most unkind acts towards one another, unveiling the true greed and violence we are capable of as a species, others look beyond these base defects to consider the potential for good that we have if we can reconnect our spirits to nature. The poems are direct in address, but spiritual and philosophical in the message which they leave lingering afterwards. Overall, Painting With Words, Poetry for a New Era, presents an optimistic new viewpoint with a clear and engaging emotional progression of how it came to be.

 “Painting with Words, Poetry for a New Era” Order through: http://ianprattis.com/PaintingWithWords.html  To avoid shipping costs, Ottawa area friends can get a signed copy directly from the author –your purchase enables you to take home a prior book or Meditation CD home for FREE, as a special thank you.

 

5 STAR Review of “Painting with Words”

Painting with Words, Poetry for a New Era 

BOOK REVIEW

 5 Star – Reviewed By Romuald Dzemo for Readers’ Favorite                                                 

 Painting with Words, Poetry for a New Era by Ian Prattis is a collection of poems that are thematically arranged and that reflect the very soul of humanity, filled with imagery and rhythms that mimic the different seasons of the human soul. The poems in this collection bear witness to what readers feel, perhaps in the hushed hours of the day; emotions, thoughts, feelings, and realities for which they find no language. This poet succeeds in capturing moments of reality that allow readers to connect with the things he writes about. The voice is powerful, the poetic lines rhythmic, and the entire collection is filled with powerful imagery. I love the depth in Ian Prattis’ poetry and the beauty in the rhythm and the richness of its diction. For instance: “A week in the life/ of a poem/ has words racing to knowing’s edge.” Here is another: “Phrases creep / over the dawn of logic, / suspended, then gone.”

Painting with Words, Poetry for a New Era opens new portals into reality. It is highly imaginative and the author articulates brilliantly on a variety of themes, from denouncing the horrors of war, to celebrating the seemingly mundane moments of life, to capturing the relationship between humanity and nature. Each poem is unique, expressing a thought, a reality, a moment in existence in a succinct manner. Some of the poems are very personal while others are universal in nature. This collection is as delightful as it is meaningful. You will read these poems and find yourself going back to them.

“Painting with Words, Poetry for a New Era” Order through: http://ianprattis.com/PaintingWithWords.html  To avoid shipping costs, Ottawa area friends can get a signed copy directly from the author –your purchase enables you to take home a prior book or Meditation CD home for FREE, as a special thank you.

 

 

Back Cover of Painting with Words: Poetry for a New Era

It is exciting to be putting the final strokes on the poetry volume. 40 years in the making – quite a surprise for me. The mug shot and Back Cover of the book displayed in this blog.

Ian Prattis was able to sift through his forty year opus of poetry written all over the world. He divides it into six moods of life, presenting experiences in all their varied richness – a curious wonder about the world of poetry into which the reader is ushered.

He has experienced truly extraordinary things, blessed with the gift of writing. He is a Poet, Global Traveler, Founder of Friends for Peace, Guru in India, Zen teacher and Spiritual Warrior for planetary care, peace and social justice. Ian presently lives in Ottawa, Canada and encourages people to find their true nature, so that humanity and the planet may be renewed. He mostly stays local to help turn the tide in his home city so that good things begin to happen spontaneously.  He is an award winning author of seventeen books. His books are screenplay-worthy epic tales that weave together seamlessly to create inspiration for global citizens staring into the abyss. His writing delivers a vigorous message about personal transformation in order to become responsible stewards of the earth and society.  His poetry, memoirs, fiction, articles, blogs and podcasts appear in a wide range of venues.

Beneath the polished urban facade remains a part of human nature that few acknowledge, because it is easier to deny the basic instincts that have kept us alive on an unforgiving earth. Ian Prattis bravely goes there in his outstanding literary work. His books, essays and poetry are a memorable experience for anyone who enjoys reading about primordial tendencies. A stone tossed into the waters of life.

Painting with Words – Part Two

My poetry volume will be out soon. It contains six distinct moods. I give a description of Part Two, which also provides the title of the book. One poem follows the intro……..

PART TWO: PAINTING WITH WORDS

I remember as a child how I blithely assumed that nature walked me when I cut school to roam the forest and rivers near my home. It brings back memories of stretching time as I explored nature’s domain. I still retain that childhood naivety about the web of life. I have always talked to birds, animals, trees, rocks and the planet. My speaking to nature provided me with an awesome, humbling sense of interconnectedness.

I have been an environmentalist all my life, long before I knew what the word meant. It emerged from an intrinsic love of nature and rapport with animals. I was often late for school, as the flowers and songbirds in the hedgerows captivated my attention, particularly in springtime, when creativity and new life exploded into being. I once attempted to explain my lateness in these terms to my schoolteacher. I was kept in at recess for my seemingly troublesome nature and made to write out 100 lines of “I will not be late for school.” I adorned my punishment schedule with drawings of birds and spring buds, and was then made to repeat the punishment. I did not understand this adult world, nor did I like it. Something in me persisted. I redid my lines, once again drawing birds on branches opening their beaks to sing joyously. I was kept in at recess for an entire week for my stubbornness, yet refused to let go of my feelings for nature. Eventually the teacher gave up on punishing me for my drawings. I was eight years old, and that is when I learned to mistrust authority figures solely concerned with control and power.

As a child I had special relationships with wild animals, in particular with one otter and a family of hedgehogs that I kept under my bed. My parents were long suffering over the stray animals I brought home, but their patience was severely stretched over the hedgehogs. The hedgehogs had to be returned to the hedgerow when I became infested with their fleas, which I passed on to my immediate family, classmates, and also to a particular schoolteacher that I was delighted to so infest!

My passion for nature was solitary; it had no encouragement from any quarter because it needed none. I have subsequently made studies of wolf and dolphin behavior, and was “adopted” by a wolf. When I first met him he was running free in the coastal mountains of British Columbia. He immediately claimed ownership — I was his! After showing me his mountain habitat and uncannily appearing every time I visited the Mt. Currie area, he chose to live with me in my hermitage in Gatineau Park forest in Quebec. It had become clear that he was a lone wolf and not part of a pack. It was in his mind to live with me in my forest home in Eastern Canada. How did he know I lived in Gatineau Park Forest in Quebec? I gave him the highly original name of “Wolfie”!

The fascination with dolphins led to many adventures, studying and swimming with them in their oceanic habitat, ranging from the Outer Hebrides in the North Atlantic, to the Java Sea north of Bali, and in the Pacific Ocean off Maui and Vancouver Island.  I was always exhilarated and totally humbled by their magnificent presence.  For me nature was never to be conquered and mastered, it was simply to see my place in a vast, interconnected, and changing web of life. 

Autumn

Trees. Dead.

Stretching fingers to the sky in pain.

Waiting for the return,

that time of warmth and renewal long forgotten,

as Fall merges with Winter’s severity.

 

The waning sky casts hues and movement to

the stillness in the lake.

Promise of a more gentle time, where winter’s cruelty

is cast aside by buds of flowers,

that insist on their dominion.

 

The evening moon,

a delicate mistress, sees it all.

The clear diamond light of spring

anticipating the aging leaves left

behind by Autumn,

shared with Summer’s bounty.

All waiting for the icy hand of Winter

to banish Autumn from the land.

 

Gatineau Forest, Quebec, 1978

 

Painting with Words

                                                         

When I published my last book, Our World is Burning, I thought I would study the writing craft more deeply. But first I had to clean out my filing cabinet, which was a total mess. I tossed stuff out and then came across a yellowing folder. It was full of forty years of my poems. Most of it was garbage but there were enough gems to create a volume made from six very different moods. This one comes from Part 5: Speaking of True Love. The volume will be published early in 2019.

Dance of the Eyes

Behind a plow of words a poet drives a furrow,

never straight.

Phrases spiral upwards as an eagle soars in a sky

with no horizon or meter.

 

Cascading into passages that hover,

tracing cosmic runes at the edge of knowing.

Words drift by on the morning mist,

a whisper of wind haunts every thought I breathe.

 

Enter the Muse – waiting wondrous so long

to grant life to this poem on dancing with the eyes

 

Slow pirouette of eyes turning en pointe,

knowing glimpses dancing with joy.

Our soft spoken adoration blows on dandelions,

creating parasols drifting to fertile ground.

 

The waltz of happiness, exhilaration of vigorous reels

leave all sadness behind –

a funeral march to banish pain elsewhere.

That was all before our eyes danced together.

 

My life lives in each glance of your eyes.

Cradled in the mosaic of green lustre smiling from you.

Gently lifting my heart you reach how deep

we bind together.

 

Connecting where the universe begins and ends.

 

Delicate curves of elegant quadrilles, staccato intensity of flamenco

and the peace of loving serenade.

We dance with our eyes, sneezy jive, convulsive samba,

cheek to cheek smooch.

 

All in place, this dance of our eyes

 

France, August 2001

Ian Prattis is a Zen teacher, poet and author. For his books go to www.ianprattis.com

Wise Words from Joanna Macy 

“Yes, it looks bleak. But you are still alive now. You are alive with all the others, in this present moment. And because the truth is speaking in the work, it unlocks the heart. And there’s such a feeling and experience of adventure. It’s like a trumpet call to a great adventure. How do we begin to deal with the plastic in the ocean that covers areas the size of countries? What are cell phones and microwaves doing to our biological rhythms? What exactly is in our food? How do we address genetic modification of crops? We are so hooked on all of this, on every level. How do we begin to contain it?

Carrying capacity is the level most people talk about. It’s a defining aspect of the climate crisis. How will we grow the food we need given huge variations and extremities of weather? How will we handle the natural disasters and famines that will result from a chaotic climate? The deeper level is that consequences will extend far beyond the collapse of this civilization. The third level of crisis is the enormous increase in the rate of extinctions – creating a loss of biodiversity so extreme that we can glimpse the doom of complex life forms. It takes highly differentiated, integrated and diverse systems to produce life forms complex enough for consciousness. The fourth level of crisis would be the destruction of everything more complex than anaeorobic life forms, because of the loss of our oxygen production in the oceans and on land.

Our little minds think it must be over, but the very fact that we are seeing it is enlivening. We know we can’t possibly see the whole thing, because we are just one part of a vast interdependent whole–one cell in a larger body. So we don’t take our own perceptions as the ultimate. My world view has been so interwoven between the Buddhist teachings and living systems theory. They inform each other so powerfully. But even in Buddhism, where impermanence is a matter of course, there are no obvious concepts to deal with super-impermanence, in the sense that humans are now bringing an end to the Cenozoic era. In the best case, there may be an Ecozoic era to follow it. Continuing on our “business-as-usual” trajectory will acidify the oceans and trigger runaway global heating, epic mass extinction and a completely new cycle of geological time. A few climate scientists consider we may have already entered into runaway climate change.

So the choice is how to live now. With the little time left, we could wake up more. We could allow this whole experience of the planet, which is intrinsically rewarding, to manifest through our heart-minds—so that the planet may see itself, so that life may see itself. Unfortunately the dominant institution of our time has been created in the image of a psychopath, and it is legally mandated to behave as such. The American broadcast media is thoroughly controlled by corporate ownership or advertising revenue. They have reduced the population to a state of such stupidity. The experiential work, is to help people make friends with uncertainty, and reframe it as a way of coming alive. Because there are never any guarantees at any point in life.

And as far as Buddhism is concerned, I find that Western Buddhists tend to privatize their practice, and look for what I call premature equanimity. They go for peace of mind and that is such an inadequate response. A major change is the relevance people are now finding in Native American teachings. There’s a deep respect for the wisdom that is there, and for the nobility of character that it fostered. I think that it is a precious addition to our triple gem—this fourth gem of our time—that the native peoples are speaking out.”

See also:  http://ianprattis.com/OurWorldIsBurning.html

Our World is Burning is an inspiring and informative read. Ian Prattis offers us valuable insight, wisdom and perspective in finding our way to a healthier world, one based on compassion and commitment, mindful of how everything we do impacts the whole.

  • Laurence Overmire, Author of “The One Idea That Saves The World”

 

Vesak Ottawa Project on Mindfulness

I will present a session on Mindfulness at the Ottawa Public Library, at Laurier/Metcalfe branch. Saturday, September 15, 12.30pm – 1.45pm, Main Room B 125. There are 35 seats available. Register by clicking on the green Register button to the right of the page. Enter your library bar code number and PIN (usually the last 4 digits of their phone number) & click on Register again. https://biblioottawalibrary.ca/en/event/mindfulness-dr-ian-prattis

Lalith Gunaratne will continue at 2pm – 4pm with Mindful Leadership and Emotional Balance – in the same room. https://biblioottawalibrary.ca/en/event/mindful-awareness-inquiry-ways-finding-emotional-balance-our-modern-lives

Bhante Savath, co-ordinator for Vesak in Ottawa will do the introduction. My session at 12.30pm will begin with a wellness chant. My talk afterwards is taken from the opening chapter of my new book – Our World is Burning: My Views on Mindful Engagement. Let me tell you a story …..

My grand-nephew James was celebrating his birthday, yet he felt awful about being nine years old. He wished he could stay five years old forever. When I asked him “Why?” he replied that if he could stay five then the Earth would not explode. His lips quivered and tears welled up in his large brown eyes. “I am scared it is too late, that there will be nothing to save,” he exclaimed with a frightened voice. He dropped the unopened gift in his hand. He was so upset. I gently guided him from the hallway of his home to sit with me on the back garden steps. It was quiet there.

James said, “I don’t want to grow up and live in a world that is burning.”

After a long talk I gave James a mindfulness plan to follow.

I talked about “Gardening in the Mind” – a basic strategy of Engaged Buddhism. I offered him eight simple steps to refine mindfulness and then engage differently with the world.

  1. Yo James – learn to be silent and quiet! Clear time and space for spiritual practice at home and throughout your daily schedule. James shouted back: Yo Uncle Ian – right on – got it!
  2. Create a stress reduction menu and subtract the negative energies in the garden of your mind.
  3. Be determined to meditate daily – do the weeding of getting rid of negative energies..
  4. Focus on and soften your heart – do not be mean – cultivate the soil of your mind’s garden.
  5. Cultivate the seeds of mindfulness – Love, Compassion, Joy, Equanimity and promote them at home, school, work and in solitude.
  6. Simplify, make do with less, de-clutter your mind and home.
  7. Taste the fruits of your spiritual practice that change your mind.
  8. Engage with the world.

James was entering all of this on his tablet as I continued to talk. “Our ways of living together, caring for environmental, political and economic realms need to be re-constructed.” I assured James that “Gardening in the Mind” has the capacity to transform how we think. Finding stillness and inner silence is a necessary first step. “We have to find a way to create the conditions for this to happen. In our modern world of fast paced lifestyles there are so many distractions that make us outwardly dependant and un-centered. We also find it easier to close down rather than open up our hearts. But the remedy is within reach. We can unravel the knots of suffering and move from being mindless to being mindful. This is achieved by gardening in the mind. The 8 point menu helps you to get there.”

I assured James that we are equal to the task and I chose not to hold back anything from him during this long conversation on his birthday. He is an unusually bright boy, as he asked questions and demanded clarification. Yet I knew he had grasped what I had said. He came up to me as I was leaving and whispered in my ear that my chat with him was his best birthday present ever.

http://ianprattis.com/OurWorldIsBurning.html

Our World is Burning is an inspiring and informative read. Ian Prattis offers us valuable insight, wisdom and perspective in finding our way to a healthier world, one based on compassion and commitment, mindful of how everything we do impacts the whole.

  • Laurence Overmire, Author of “The One Idea That Saves The World”