Tag Archives: War Museum

Pine Gate – Volume 13, Issue 1: Winter 2014

We are entering the 13th year of putting out Pine Gate’s Online Buddhist journal. Enjoy the beautiful new look created by Production Editor Yves Desnoyers. The issue is a work of art in its own right! A bow of gratitude to all the contributors. To read or download please go to:
http://www.ianprattis.com/PineGate/PineGateNewsletter.html

The latest issue – Volume 13, Issue 1: Winter 2014 – contains articles on Educators Mindfulness Retreat, Renewing Buddhism, Five Mindfulness Trainings, Friends for Peace, YouthBuild, Sangha Outreach, Engaged Buddhism, Soft Heart Meditation, Poems, Quotes, Humor and much more. The feature article on the Indigenous Elders Statement is by Chief Orval Looking Horse and other elder signatories..
Table of Contents – Pine Gate Volume 13, Issue 1: Winter 2014
1. Peace Ambassadors – Ian Prattis
2. 2013 Friends for Peace Day – Koozma Tarasoff
3. Educators Mindfulness Retreat – Lisa Karuna
4. Renewing Buddhism – Thay
5. New Dharma Talks on YouTube – Pine Gate Mindfulness Community
6. Winter Study Session – Pine Gate Mindfulness Community
7. Soft Heart Meditation – Jacqueline Shoemaker Holmes
8. YouthBuild and the Eight Fold Path – John Bell
9. Indigenous Elders Statement – Chief Orval Looking Horse
10. Ottawa Friends of Tibet – Barbara Brown
11. Seeds of Peace – Michael Anzonye
12. Alchemy – Angie Kehler
13. Presence – Rumi
14. What If Nobody Shows Up? – Ian Prattis
15. Water in the Wave Day of Mindfulness – Jim Ebaugh
16. You Are Just A Man – Dave Kot
17. Peace: The Exhibition – Pine Gate Mindfulness Community
18. Engaged Practice and the OI – Ian Prattis
19. Quotes
20. Pine Gate Mindfulness Community

Pine Gate is the voice of Ottawa’s Pine Gate Mindfulness Community who practice Engaged Buddhism inspired by Thich Nhat Hanh, the Dalai Lama and Sulak Sivaraksa – great teachers for our times. Pine Gate is also the nucleus of Friends for Peace. The Mayor of Ottawa, Jim Watson, had this to say: “Friends for Peace is an outstanding organization that does very important work, promoting, strengthening and maintaining peace, planetary care and social justice within our communities and the environment.”
Friends of Pine Gate also contribute to the journal. Submissions are invited, articles of approximately 700 – 1,000 words, poems and insights that reflect engaged practice and personal experience. The community has many leaders and the newsletter is an organic outcome of collective insight. Effortlessly it appears. It is a Quarterly online Buddhist Journal, appearing three times a year. Quirky!
Find us online at: http://ianprattis.com/PineGate/index.html
and on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/pinegatesangha

Editor: Ian Prattis
Production Editor: Yves Desnoyers
Copy Editor: Carolyn Hill
Ian is the dharmacharya (teacher) at Pine Gate and the founder of Friends for Peace.
Pine Gate Meditation Hall

Peace – The Exhibition

Peace – The Exhibition                                                         Ian Prattis

It is a long and winding road that led to the peace exhibition at the Canadian War Museum, which will run to January 5, 2014. The initial conversation opened a decade ago with Physicians for Global Survival, the Quakers – supported by Friends for Peace – pitching to the museum director the idea of Canadian soldiers going to war to enable peace for their families. The conversation continued with the Canadian Department of Peace group taking a lead role. They found support in a historian who liked the basic idea. The curator of “Peace – The Exhibition” is Dr. Amber Lloydlangsten and she and her team did a terrific job putting it together with very diverse themes.

The exhibition is impressive and extensive with many surprises. A clock from the destruction of Hiroshima, a blue beret from the first UN peacekeeping mission, a World War I Victoria Cross medal awarded to a Canadian stretcher bearer to mention only a few.

There is a station where you can make your own Peace Button – great attraction for kids. Also an art gallery of peace with a tour to see how art reflects the themes of the exhibit. A highlight for me was the attention paid to the Great Peace Law of the Iroquois Confederacy. How it came about and how it is relevant to the present day negotiation between aboriginal peoples and Canadian Institutions.  Treaty 7 provides an elaborate case study. The debate is opened up about Canada’s role as a peace keeping nation with a chart showing different options and outcomes.  The mantle that Canada has worn since Lester Pearson’s days has been diminished since Mr. Harper became Prime Minister of Canada. Do we want a change? That is the question raised in a very challenging way. War is not sanitized, neither is the protest movement nor the peace keeping role. We see how Canadians throughout their history have negotiated, organized and intervened for peace. Interactive stations about Haiti, Afghanistan, the Sudan and more, plus play stations for children to grasp the issues are there to encourage them to think and reflect what they want to see in a future Canada.

I hope teachers make this exhibit a must see locale for school trips. The Peace Exhibition is very well put together. I cannot think of any War Museum in the world that has such an emphasis on peace processes. Peace is a vital part of the story of Canada and it is still evolving and diverse. I encourage everyone to pay a visit – and take children. A Peace Button awaits them!