Tag Archives: Humor

Foreword Clarion Review of Redemption

Foreword Clarion Review of Redemption               

“An admirable command of language brings to every scene a striking visual clarity.”

A lost manuscript from 1975 reveals the depths of a sensitive man’s soul in this pondering look at life nearing a crossroads. Not until 2011 did Ian Prattis pick up his heartfelt novel again, a book he titled Redemption. Set in the Hebrides off the northwest coast of Scotland, an unpretentious locale steeped in regional culture, this story focuses on an eccentric yet down-to-earth protagonist named Callum Mor. Subject to individual understanding and loaded with the symbolism often found in parables, the book alludes to more than what is openly stated in the narrative. Like all interpretive fiction, Prattis’s writing will communicate a different meaning to anyone who attempts to analyze his carefully crafted words. Short but powerful, Redemption may leave a person wondering whether pieces of this tale were intentionally obscured, for the plot covers an extensive period of time from Callum Mor’s childhood to maturity.

An admirable command of language brings to every scene a striking visual clarity. In this descriptive passage, the devastated mood surrounding Callum Mor’s father can be seen and felt in contrast to the harsh elements of nature: “In the wake of the gale, the day had produced a hazy sunlight that made the reeds in the marsh glimmer, but the unexpected heat in the day could do nothing to warm the cold, vacant, deadness that now enveloped Andrew.”

As Callum Mor ages, he slips into abject loneliness and succumbs to alcoholism before he goes through a positive reawakening. Gentle, with a poignant affection for animals, this cosmically aware lover of God’s creatures seems to collapse under the brutality of man’s instinct to inflict pain. To a certain degree, this somewhat typical view of morality confronting immorality causes the novel to fall into a vague realm of timeless storytelling for any indefinable, poetic piece without a specific purpose. This does not detract from the literary quality, but anyone seeking an indisputable message will not find it here. In this scene, winter emerges as a villainous character: “The wind from the north soughed softly along the shore but froze any man it gripped. The cold stole into every door and numbed the hands and minds of those unprepared for it.”

Ian Prattis is a professor of anthropology and religion. A peace and environmental activist, he was born in the UK. Prattis has spent much of his life living and teaching in Canada. This moving and eye-opening book will be a memorable experience for anyone who enjoys reading about primordial tendencies. Beneath a polished urban facade remains a part of human nature that few want to acknowledge, either due to fear or simply because it is easier to deny the basic instincts that have kept us alive on an unforgiving earth.

Julia Ann Charpentier

Available at www.Amazon.com  and www.BarnesandNoble.com   Autographed Book – Order Through: http://www.ianprattis.com/Redemption.html

 

BlueInk Review of Trailing Sky Six Feathers

BlueInk Review is the authoritative voice in the Indie publishing world, always looking for “next generation” books worth reading. I am humbled by their assessment of my new work. This review will appear on http://www.BlueInkReview.com in four weeks.

Trailing Sky Six Feathers: One Man’s Journey with His Muse
Ian Prattis
Xlibris, 199 pages, (paperback) $19.99, 978-1493196791
(Reviewed: June, 2014)

In this spiritual exploration, a highly educated man becomes a humble seeker, works
painstakingly through the events of two fascinating lifetimes, and emerges with a
message for humankind.

British/Canadian author Ian Prattis has taught university-level religion and anthropology, but even with this impressive intellectual grounding, his journey was incomplete until he contacted
Trailing Sky Six Feathers, a powerful female shaman to whom he believes he was wed,
in the 1700s, in Arizona. In 1777, her final vow as he lay dying was, “I will find you, my
husband.”

Prattis, whose childhood was marred by sexual abuse, set out to comprehend his
present life through his study of religious beliefs of indigenous peoples. This led him to
encounters with several contemporary Native American sages who forced him to drop
his intellectual approach and accept his lustrous spiritual experiences as real, not
dreams or self-induced visions. The merging of the parallel spirit world of Native
American religion into his current incarnation put many disparate elements of his life in
perspective and facilitated his reunion with Trailing Sky Six Feathers, “the greatest
medicine woman the Southwest has ever known.”

Though this fantastic tale leaves room for skepticism, most who read Prattis’ latest work
will be swept up in this saga of self-examination, revelation, and indeed, exhilarating
global adventure. Prattis writes with erudition, charm and humor, ridiculing his own
blunders as much as he praises his teachers.

Now a spiritual retreat leader, Prattis presents a unique viewpoint hewn from hard-won
exploration of traditional wisdom, offering all of us the overarching advice to “awaken
spiritually” so that we may “create a stable economy and way of life” and save Mother
Earth.

Also available in hardcover and ebook.

Light Beam at the centre of the Medicine Wheel

The Middle Finger Sutra

The Middle Finger Sutra                                                                   Ian Prattis

Good intentions meet wrong perceptions creating disaster!

This teaching by the wise one was passed on by a lady in a bookstore.

“The other day I went into the local religious bookstore, where I saw a “Honk If You Love Jesus” bumper sticker. Although not a Christian I thought this was a great sentiment with respect to Global Religious Harmony. So I bought it and put it on the back bumper of my car, and I’m really glad I did that, as it brought forward a wonderful response from all kinds of people of many faiths and cultures. What an uplifting experience it was for all of us.

I was stopped at a light at a busy intersection, just lost in thought of the Divine and I did not notice that the light had changed. But that bumper sticker really worked as I found lots of people who loved Jesus. Why, the guy behind me started to honk like crazy. He must have really loved his Lord because pretty soon he leaned out his window and yelled “Jesus Christ” as loud as he could. It was like a football game with his shouting “Go Jesus Go.” Everyone else started honking too, so I leaned out of my window and waved and smiled to all those loving people. There must have been a guy from Florida back there because I could hear him yelling something about a “sunny beach”, and I saw him waving in a funny way with his middle finger stuck up in the air. I asked my two kids on the back seat what that meant, they giggled and said it was the Hawaiian good luck sign, so I leaned out the window and gave him the good luck sign back.

Several cars behind, a very nice large man stepped out of his car and yelled something I could not hear. It sounded something like “mother trucker.” Maybe he was from Florida too. He must really love the Lord. A couple of people were so caught up in the joy that they got out of their cars and were walking towards me. I bet they wanted us all to meditate together, but then the light changed to yellow and I stepped on the gas. I was the only one to get across the intersection as everyone was meditating and waving their middle fingers. I leaned out of the window and gave them a big happy smile and held up the Hawaiian good luck sign and drove away. Praise the heavens for all those wonderful meditators.”

The followers of the wise one immediately put the Middle Finger Sutra into practice at every intersection in the city.